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Alexandra Pirici

  • The performative work of Alexandra Pirici (b. 1982, Bucharest, Romania, currently based between Bucharest and Berlin) addresses the political potential of aesthetics by connecting movement -- specifically, the body and its energy -- to a re-reading of historical and art historical narratives. She produces enactments, or living sculptures, with performers referencing existing sculptures or monuments in specific contexts. Her first actions in Bucharest occurred in the context of the economic crisis and continuous budget cuts for the arts; notably “If You Don’t Want Us, We Want You” (2011), which confronted the placing of human bodies in relation to heroic, sometimes controversial sculptures, or monuments in public spaces in Bucharest. Intended as a protest action against the state’s cultural policy, these interventions produced friction with playfulness and humor, de-monumentalizing official populist art with the live presence of the human scale. Central to her practice is the questioning of a performance’s function within today’s event economy. Through continuing to interrogate and enquire about the possibility of collective bodies in space and time, Pirici’s work attentively provides an important insight into the living and digital age.

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Alexandra Pirici

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The performative work of Alexandra Pirici (b. 1982, Bucharest, Romania, currently based between Bucharest and Berlin) addresses the political potential of aesthetics by connecting movement — specifically, the body and its energy — to a re-reading of historical and art historical narratives. She produces enactments, or living sculptures, with performers referencing existing sculptures or monuments in specific contexts. Her first actions in Bucharest occurred in the context of the economic crisis and continuous budget cuts for the arts; notably “If You Don’t Want Us, We Want You” (2011), which confronted the placing of human bodies in relation to heroic, sometimes controversial sculptures, or monuments in public spaces in Bucharest. Intended as a protest action against the state’s cultural policy, these interventions produced friction with playfulness and humor, de-monumentalizing official populist art with the live presence of the human scale. Central to her practice is the questioning of a performance’s function within today’s event economy. Through continuing to interrogate and enquire about the possibility of collective bodies in space and time, Pirici’s work attentively provides an important insight into the living and digital age.