Andrew Ekins

  • Andrew Ekins’ work frequently deals with waste and recycling, using discarded materials to make something new. This in itself is not unusual, but the fact that he uses discarded paint, finishing up ends of cans, as well as discarded furniture differentiates him from other similar artists, for the work becomes a self-reflexive process. He is interested not simply in the alchemical side of this practice, but in the way in which things can slide in entropy, forming their own shapes determined by gravity. Paint becomes a malleable substance in his work, a sculptural material at the same time as a painterly one, dealing with themes related to human existence and abjection.

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Kadist Artworks

Andrew Ekins

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Andrew Ekins’ work frequently deals with waste and recycling, using discarded materials to make something new. This in itself is not unusual, but the fact that he uses discarded paint, finishing up ends of cans, as well as discarded furniture differentiates him from other similar artists, for the work becomes a self-reflexive process. He is interested not simply in the alchemical side of this practice, but in the way in which things can slide in entropy, forming their own shapes determined by gravity. Paint becomes a malleable substance in his work, a sculptural material at the same time as a painterly one, dealing with themes related to human existence and abjection.