Christoph Keller

  • Christoph Keller’s works function between science and art and have a practical as well as an aesthetic application. They are interventions into reality as well as inventions. Keller is fascinated by previous scientific undertakings such as Wilhelm Reich’s Cloudbuster project that Keller re-enacted from the roof of PS1 in an attempt to make rain over New York in the Spring and Summer of 2003 using orgone and nuclear energy. Keller’s stance is at once social political and artistic. He is engaged in debates around existence and the human condition. His project Helioflex is an attempt, using mirrors, to ‘bypass the social gradient of access to sunlight in urban habitations’, in other words to bring sunlight to areas normally in shadow at an affordable price. According to Keller the density of building generates a social gradient of sunlight in urban areas. The top floors bathe in light that is missing in the bottom floors. The device bypasses this gradient and creates a connection to the outside world by reflecting natural light to spaces that have never seen the sun before.’ Keller’s political engagement is in the tradition of Josef Beuys, who taught at the Free University in Berlin where Keller began to study physics in 1988. Christoph Keller is a German artist who studied math, physics and hydrology before studying liberal arts in Berlin. Christoph Keller was born in  Fribourg, Germany, in 1967. He lives and works in Berlin.

    More ▼ 
Christoph Keller

News

More News ▼

 

Christoph Keller’s works function between science and art and have a practical as well as an aesthetic application. They are interventions into reality as well as inventions. Keller is fascinated by previous scientific undertakings such as Wilhelm Reich’s Cloudbuster project that Keller re-enacted from the roof of PS1 in an attempt to make rain over New York in the Spring and Summer of 2003 using orgone and nuclear energy. Keller’s stance is at once social political and artistic. He is engaged in debates around existence and the human condition. His project Helioflex is an attempt, using mirrors, to ‘bypass the social gradient of access to sunlight in urban habitations’, in other words to bring sunlight to areas normally in shadow at an affordable price. According to Keller the density of building generates a social gradient of sunlight in urban areas. The top floors bathe in light that is missing in the bottom floors. The device bypasses this gradient and creates a connection to the outside world by reflecting natural light to spaces that have never seen the sun before.’ Keller’s political engagement is in the tradition of Josef Beuys, who taught at the Free University in Berlin where Keller began to study physics in 1988. Christoph Keller is a German artist who studied math, physics and hydrology before studying liberal arts in Berlin.
Christoph Keller was born in  Fribourg, Germany, in 1967. He lives and works in Berlin.