Douglas Gordon

  • The works of Douglas Gordon span across film, video, installation, photography, sculpture in a play with the universal dualities life and death,  innocence and guilt, and dual identities. "I like to build self-destructive systems or mechanisms that lead to the multiplicity of meaning, in a series of contradictory interpretations. I love it when a conspiracy of circumstances can help build a sense for a work, or may return against it at any moment," says the artist. In his videos, the artist offers a new experience of cinema in the space of contemporary art thus creating "exhibition cinema" as critic Dominique Païni has suggested. His work stems from the ideas of Walter Benjamin, who compared cinema to the action of a surgeon who deeply penetrates the heart of reality. In "24 Hour Psycho" (1993), the famous Alfred Hitchcock movie is dilated to 24 hours in a gesture that monumentalizes time and intensifies the photogram. Above all, the artist questions memory and perception, looking for what is latent in the images, objects, and sounds.Douglas Gordon was born in 1966 in Glasgow, Scotland. He lives and works in New York.

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Douglas Gordon

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The works of Douglas Gordon span across film, video, installation, photography, sculpture in a play with the universal dualities life and death,  innocence and guilt, and dual identities. “I like to build self-destructive systems or mechanisms that lead to the multiplicity of meaning, in a series of contradictory interpretations. I love it when a conspiracy of circumstances can help build a sense for a work, or may return against it at any moment,” says the artist. In his videos, the artist offers a new experience of cinema in the space of contemporary art thus creating “exhibition cinema” as critic Dominique Païni has suggested. His work stems from the ideas of Walter Benjamin, who compared cinema to the action of a surgeon who deeply penetrates the heart of reality. In “24 Hour Psycho” (1993), the famous Alfred Hitchcock movie is dilated to 24 hours in a gesture that monumentalizes time and intensifies the photogram. Above all, the artist questions memory and perception, looking for what is latent in the images, objects, and sounds.
Douglas Gordon was born in 1966 in Glasgow, Scotland. He lives and works in New York.