Fabrice Hyber

  • In each of his self-portraits, Fabrice Hyber (he removed the last "t" in Hybert in 2004) is elusive. This has been expressed in the photo "C'est le moment de se préparer à de nouvelles expériences" (It's time to prepare for new experiences) (1987), or when we look at the upside down, hanging by one foot in "Traduction, le plus gros savon du monde" (Translation, the biggest soap in the world) (1991). "I? am an alien! " says the artist. "Games and shifts are the only things able to face any kind of fundamentalism. Trade, commerce, image and poetry are means of osmosis. Through them gradually you can set up all of the ways to increase life beyond death. It is necessary to mix time, upgrade products, and imagine that works die in order to be assimilated then revisited. A work is absolutely not precognitive but always from here" said Fabrice Hyber in conversation with Thierry Laurent. Fabrice Hyber was born in 1961 in Luçon, France. He lives and works in Paris.

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In each of his self-portraits, Fabrice Hyber (he removed the last “t” in Hybert in 2004) is elusive. This has been expressed in the photo “C’est le moment de se préparer à de nouvelles expériences” (It’s time to prepare for new experiences) (1987), or when we look at the upside down, hanging by one foot in “Traduction, le plus gros savon du monde” (Translation, the biggest soap in the world) (1991). “I? am an alien! ” says the artist. “Games and shifts are the only things able to face any kind of fundamentalism. Trade, commerce, image and poetry are means of osmosis. Through them gradually you can set up all of the ways to increase life beyond death. It is necessary to mix time, upgrade products, and imagine that works die in order to be assimilated then revisited. A work is absolutely not precognitive but always from here” said Fabrice Hyber in conversation with Thierry Laurent.
Fabrice Hyber was born in 1961 in Luçon, France. He lives and works in Paris.