string(2) ":)"

Ibro Hasanovic

  • Ibro Hasanovic is a film, video, photographic and installation artist currently based in Brussels, Belgium, concerned largely with the powers of individual and collective memory. As a witness of recent global catastrophic history in Yugoslavia, Hasanovic’s practice is concerned largely with geopolitical and social concerns. His work focuses on micro-events, making History with a capital H graspable on the level of the personal, even anecdotal -- a masterly technique described namely by Theodor Adorno and largely employed by seminal artists and writers throughout the 20th century -- in an attempt to tackle with excruciating and torturous events such as war, loss, persecution, displacement and torture. Rather than addressing the full-blown horror of recent armed conflicts and ethnical belligerency in a moral or activist mode, the artist casts a closer look at what this entails for the individual or certain groups who are exposed to violence, or the sheer memory of it. Violence, when omnipresent, is not detected as being outrageous and blameful. Rather, ordinary people perceive it as a routinely performed act. Hasanovi? undermines the contemporary epoch that purports violence as a byproduct of politics; as a contemporary status quo.

    More ▼ 

Kadist Artworks

Ibro Hasanovic

News

More News ▼

 

Ibro Hasanovic is a film, video, photographic and installation artist currently based in Brussels, Belgium, concerned largely with the powers of individual and collective memory. As a witness of recent global catastrophic history in Yugoslavia, Hasanovic’s practice is concerned largely with geopolitical and social concerns. His work focuses on micro-events, making History with a capital H graspable on the level of the personal, even anecdotal — a masterly technique described namely by Theodor Adorno and largely employed by seminal artists and writers throughout the 20th century — in an attempt to tackle with excruciating and torturous events such as war, loss, persecution, displacement and torture. Rather than addressing the full-blown horror of recent armed conflicts and ethnical belligerency in a moral or activist mode, the artist casts a closer look at what this entails for the individual or certain groups who are exposed to violence, or the sheer memory of it. Violence, when omnipresent, is not detected as being outrageous and blameful. Rather, ordinary people perceive it as a routinely performed act. Hasanovi? undermines the contemporary epoch that purports violence as a byproduct of politics; as a contemporary status quo.