Jordan Ann Craig

  • Jordan Ann Craig is a Northern Cheyenne artist born and raised in the Bay Area; she invests her work with a strong interest in Native American culture and the history of its destruction by settlers. Her mother was adopted from the reservations however Craig herself has never lived there. According to the artist, “my mother tells me her greatest gift is Native American blood: Northern Cheyenne and a little Zuni.” Working in series, the artist tells stories of forgetting how to sleep, her relationships with her sisters, the life of an unlucky ladybug, and the translation of language and dreams. She writes, “my work is often beautiful, masking ugly histories. I keep Indigenous textiles, beads, and pottery, Aboriginal paintings, and landscapes in my periphery when I make art.” The process is meticulous and meditative, often obsessive in mark and repetition. Craig makes drawings of Native American objects and then transfers them to her computer before enhancing the drawings to create designs that help her predict the final outcome. Much of the creativity happens through technology, with the original pieces meticulous, handmade and spiritual. The actual painting becomes a matter of execution and precision, offering a contemporary perspective in seeing and understanding Indigenous design.”

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Jordan Ann Craig

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Jordan Ann Craig is a Northern Cheyenne artist born and raised in the Bay Area; she invests her work with a strong interest in Native American culture and the history of its destruction by settlers. Her mother was adopted from the reservations however Craig herself has never lived there.

According to the artist, “my mother tells me her greatest gift is Native American blood: Northern Cheyenne and a little Zuni.” Working in series, the artist tells stories of forgetting how to sleep, her relationships with her sisters, the life of an unlucky ladybug, and the translation of language and dreams. She writes, “my work is often beautiful, masking ugly histories. I keep Indigenous textiles, beads, and pottery, Aboriginal paintings, and landscapes in my periphery when I make art.” The process is meticulous and meditative, often obsessive in mark and repetition.

Craig makes drawings of Native American objects and then transfers them to her computer before enhancing the drawings to create designs that help her predict the final outcome. Much of the creativity happens through technology, with the original pieces meticulous, handmade and spiritual. The actual painting becomes a matter of execution and precision, offering a contemporary perspective in seeing and understanding Indigenous design.”