Judith Hopf

  • In her sculptures, installations and videos, German artist Judith Hopf transforms everyday settings and humble materials into comic expressions of humanist values, verging on the absurd. With an understated concision characteristic of her practice, the artist herself describes her working method as an attempt to do something “that doesn’t put me in a bad mood.” Claude Lévi-Strauss’s concept of bricolage resonates not only with Hopf’s formal approach but also in conceptual terms, in the way her works are open to new connections based on their changing context. Resonating with and embodying all the things experienced in a society of overstretching, burnout and chronic exhaustion, Hopf creates sculptures, furniture and absurdist films. She uses humor and wit to address the politics of art making, group dynamics, and the impact of technology on perception and human experience.

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Judith Hopf

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In her sculptures, installations and videos, German artist Judith Hopf transforms everyday settings and humble materials into comic expressions of humanist values, verging on the absurd. With an understated concision characteristic of her practice, the artist herself describes her working method as an attempt to do something “that doesn’t put me in a bad mood.” Claude Lévi-Strauss’s concept of bricolage resonates not only with Hopf’s formal approach but also in conceptual terms, in the way her works are open to new connections based on their changing context. Resonating with and embodying all the things experienced in a society of overstretching, burnout and chronic exhaustion, Hopf creates sculptures, furniture and absurdist films. She uses humor and wit to address the politics of art making, group dynamics, and the impact of technology on perception and human experience.