Loris Gréaud

  • Research by Loris Gréaud is pieced together in the exhibition space in effort to build a total work of art and a world view. "Cellar Door," his solo exhibition held at the Palais de Tokyo in  2008, is constructed like a movie set, spanning across divergent processes and temporalities. Gréaud's work, extracted from science fiction literature, technology, and science, questions immateriality as well as the real and the virtual. He is known to make references to Yves Klein in "The Merzball Pavilion" (2008), to spread the smell of the planet Mars in "Spirit" (2005), to remodel an apartment magnetic fields specialist in "Residents 1" (2005), to send messages in Morse code by light in "Limen" (2003), and create nanosculptures with "Untilted01" (2006). The artist does not make the invisible visible, but instead makes the invisible readable. "These notions of invisibility and off-screen non-presence are engines of desire" Gréaud states. Paul Ardenne when speaking about Gréaud referred to him as the "artist as phenomenologist," describing his works and their high degree of sophistication as a "phenomenological subject." Loris Gréaud was born in 1979 in Eaubonne, France. He lives and works in Paris.

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Loris Gréaud

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Research by Loris Gréaud is pieced together in the exhibition space in effort to build a total work of art and a world view. “Cellar Door,” his solo exhibition held at the Palais de Tokyo in  2008, is constructed like a movie set, spanning across divergent processes and temporalities. Gréaud’s work, extracted from science fiction literature, technology, and science, questions immateriality as well as the real and the virtual. He is known to make references to Yves Klein in “The Merzball Pavilion” (2008), to spread the smell of the planet Mars in “Spirit” (2005), to remodel an apartment magnetic fields specialist in “Residents 1” (2005), to send messages in Morse code by light in “Limen” (2003), and create nanosculptures with “Untilted01” (2006). The artist does not make the invisible visible, but instead makes the invisible readable. “These notions of invisibility and off-screen non-presence are engines of desire” Gréaud states. Paul Ardenne when speaking about Gréaud referred to him as the “artist as phenomenologist,” describing his works and their high degree of sophistication as a “phenomenological subject.”

 

Loris Gréaud was born in 1979 in Eaubonne, France. He lives and works in Paris.