Miao Ying

  • Miao Ying’s practice, including video, installation, website, photography and painting, highlights the attempts to discuss mainstream technology and contemporary consciousness and its impact on our daily lives, along with the new modes of politics, aesthetics and consciousness created during the representation of reality through technology. Through her works she emphasises the fallacy of a global internet culture while simultaneously underscoring the undemocratic use of networked power in both China and other regions of the world, such as the United States. At the same time, her self-diagnosed Chinternet (referring to China's online culture and media spheres), Stockholm syndrome celebrates the ingenuity, humour, and intelligence of Chinese internet users, and the rich visual culture they have cultivated behind the firewall. Her works often adopt many of these users’ creative workarounds, which are strategies she describes in positive terms as ‘self-censorship.’ At last, she interrogates the dialectical relationship between the Chinternet and the World Wide Web, unspooling and parodying complex issues of global capitalism, online propaganda, and media democracy.

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Miao Ying

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Miao Ying’s practice, including video, installation, website, photography and painting, highlights the attempts to discuss mainstream technology and contemporary consciousness and its impact on our daily lives, along with the new modes of politics, aesthetics and consciousness created during the representation of reality through technology. Through her works she emphasises the fallacy of a global internet culture while simultaneously underscoring the undemocratic use of networked power in both China and other regions of the world, such as the United States. At the same time, her self-diagnosed Chinternet (referring to China’s online culture and media spheres), Stockholm syndrome celebrates the ingenuity, humour, and intelligence of Chinese internet users, and the rich visual culture they have cultivated behind the firewall. Her works often adopt many of these users’ creative workarounds, which are strategies she describes in positive terms as ‘self-censorship.’ At last, she interrogates the dialectical relationship between the Chinternet and the World Wide Web, unspooling and parodying complex issues of global capitalism, online propaganda, and media democracy.