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Naama Tsabar

  • Naama Tsabar is an Israel-born, New York-based sculpture artist. Examining the conditions of musical performances in galleries and museums as well as in public space, her work comprises installations and performances which address structures of power and modes of empowerment. She has a distinct approach to the deconstruction and appropriation of materials and instruments with a strong focus on the guitar as the iconic instrument of rock musicians. Tsabar’s work is influenced by her experience as a member of a punk band herself, using sound as a means of addressing various issues of the performance of music and its associated industry, from implicit gender roles to the social and economic mechanisms of the milieu. Her sculptures reference the traditions of contemporary art history as well as the tradition of live musical performances, often demonstrated by an amplifier linked to sculptures. In other cases, her deconstruction of musical instruments involves one or multiple performers inside a sculptural set. Her participatory works include either an implicit invitation to the gallery visitor to play the instrument, or involve musicians as guest performers, turning the gallery into a live performative setting. When inviting performers to her sets, she is conscious about giving space to women and gender nonconforming musicians.

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Naama Tsabar

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Naama Tsabar is an Israel-born, New York-based sculpture artist. Examining the conditions of musical performances in galleries and museums as well as in public space, her work comprises installations and performances which address structures of power and modes of empowerment. She has a distinct approach to the deconstruction and appropriation of materials and instruments with a strong focus on the guitar as the iconic instrument of rock musicians.

Tsabar’s work is influenced by her experience as a member of a punk band herself, using sound as a means of addressing various issues of the performance of music and its associated industry, from implicit gender roles to the social and economic mechanisms of the milieu. Her sculptures reference the traditions of contemporary art history as well as the tradition of live musical performances, often demonstrated by an amplifier linked to sculptures. In other cases, her deconstruction of musical instruments involves one or multiple performers inside a sculptural set. Her participatory works include either an implicit invitation to the gallery visitor to play the instrument, or involve musicians as guest performers, turning the gallery into a live performative setting. When inviting performers to her sets, she is conscious about giving space to women and gender nonconforming musicians.