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Nadia Myre

  • The work of Nadia Myre, member of the Kitigan Zibi Anishinabeg First Nation, is notable for its embrace of cross-cultural mediations as a strategy towards celebrating and reclaiming the far-reaching intellectual and aesthetic contributions of Indigenous communities. Concerned with the specificities of the Anishinabeg as well as pan-Indigenous experiences of loss and resilience and the struggle for healing and reclamation—though not necessarily reconciliation—Myre’s research and material practices examine the languages of power inherent in the mechanisms of museum display formats and their resulting production (and erasure) of knowledge. Reclaiming historical objects and archival documents like the Canadian Federal Government’s Indian Act through re-creation via traditional means such as communal weaving and beading circles, Myre’s artistic work initiates timely discussions regarding Indigenous rights and futures. In wider terms, the artist’s approach also provokes reflection on the role of object-centred scholarship and craft production within visual arts practice, testing the boundaries of how material history and craft are understood and positioned within established, rarefied contexts of artistic display.

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Nadia Myre

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The work of Nadia Myre, member of the Kitigan Zibi Anishinabeg First Nation, is notable for its embrace of cross-cultural mediations as a strategy towards celebrating and reclaiming the far-reaching intellectual and aesthetic contributions of Indigenous communities. Concerned with the specificities of the Anishinabeg as well as pan-Indigenous experiences of loss and resilience and the struggle for healing and reclamation—though not necessarily reconciliation—Myre’s research and material practices examine the languages of power inherent in the mechanisms of museum display formats and their resulting production (and erasure) of knowledge. Reclaiming historical objects and archival documents like the Canadian Federal Government’s Indian Act through re-creation via traditional means such as communal weaving and beading circles, Myre’s artistic work initiates timely discussions regarding Indigenous rights and futures. In wider terms, the artist’s approach also provokes reflection on the role of object-centred scholarship and craft production within visual arts practice, testing the boundaries of how material history and craft are understood and positioned within established, rarefied contexts of artistic display.