Paloma Bosquê

  • Play and intuition are an important part of Paloma Bosquê’s process and approach to sculpture. As she stumbles upon materials, she brings them to her studio to reimagine their potential new lives. Rather than being concerned with the symbolic weight and connotations that materials may carry from their previous lives, what interests Bosquê is their form, their physical presence, and the possible relationships that may unfold between them.   While some of the materials she uses, such as brass, bronze, and wood, are part of the traditional vernacular of sculpture, she also incorporates a range of unconventional, organic materials borrowed from the everyday: charcoal, beeswax, animal guts, handmade papers, coffee sieves, and beeswax included. Playing with the contrasting qualities between materials—the cold and rigid nature of metals against the warmth and irregularity of hand-woven wool or beeswax—Bosquê achieves a delicate balance of texture and weight, never forcing the materials or transforming them beyond recognition. This intuitive way of responding to the materials’ specificity is evocative of the notion of animism, the belief that inanimate objects, plants, rocks, soil, weather systems…etc., have a spiritual essence, and as such, are all interconnected.   Her restrained economy of materials and inclination for formal simplicity, echo the sensibility of artists like Eva Hesse and Louise Bourgeois, where both geometry and formlessness can co-exist. Embracing both the fluid contours of nature and the ideal angles of platonic form, akin to Hesse and Bourgeois, Bosquê’s sculptural vocabulary reminds us of the delicate balance that holds us together.

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Paloma Bosquê

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Play and intuition are an important part of Paloma Bosquê’s process and approach to sculpture. As she stumbles upon materials, she brings them to her studio to reimagine their potential new lives. Rather than being concerned with the symbolic weight and connotations that materials may carry from their previous lives, what interests Bosquê is their form, their physical presence, and the possible relationships that may unfold between them.

 

While some of the materials she uses, such as brass, bronze, and wood, are part of the traditional vernacular of sculpture, she also incorporates a range of unconventional, organic materials borrowed from the everyday: charcoal, beeswax, animal guts, handmade papers, coffee sieves, and beeswax included. Playing with the contrasting qualities between materials—the cold and rigid nature of metals against the warmth and irregularity of hand-woven wool or beeswax—Bosquê achieves a delicate balance of texture and weight, never forcing the materials or transforming them beyond recognition. This intuitive way of responding to the materials’ specificity is evocative of the notion of animism, the belief that inanimate objects, plants, rocks, soil, weather systems…etc., have a spiritual essence, and as such, are all interconnected.

 

Her restrained economy of materials and inclination for formal simplicity, echo the sensibility of artists like Eva Hesse and Louise Bourgeois, where both geometry and formlessness can co-exist. Embracing both the fluid contours of nature and the ideal angles of platonic form, akin to Hesse and Bourgeois, Bosquê’s sculptural vocabulary reminds us of the delicate balance that holds us together.