string(2) ":)"

Prinz Gholam

  • Prinz Gholam is a Berlin-based artist duo consisting of Wolfgang Prinz and Michel Gholam. For nearly a decade, the duo have developed a performative practice that, through a series of choreographed sequences, aims at embodying a range of source material—from ancient paintings, sculptures to contemporary art, film and images from the media. Reminiscent of Gilbert and George’s living sculptures, the long-term collaboration revolves around a corporeal interpretation of the world around us: their various gestures and poses act as a form of mapping through the body of the array of information they internalize. Often performed in historically loaded venues, like a graveyard or an archaeological site, their work speaks of the information we carry in our bodies and how we experience and negotiate the world through images the mind already contains. In addition to their performances, the duo often use drawings to sketch the poses that they reenact. These preparatory studies, while referencing pictorial tradition, also play a role in their investigation: a negotiation between references, and the physical and pictorial self. 

    More ▼ 

Collection Artworks

Prinz Gholam

News

More News ▼

 

Prinz Gholam is a Berlin-based artist duo consisting of Wolfgang Prinz and Michel Gholam.

For nearly a decade, the duo have developed a performative practice that, through a series of choreographed sequences, aims at embodying a range of source material—from ancient paintings, sculptures to contemporary art, film and images from the media. Reminiscent of Gilbert and George’s living sculptures, the long-term collaboration revolves around a corporeal interpretation of the world around us: their various gestures and poses act as a form of mapping through the body of the array of information they internalize. Often performed in historically loaded venues, like a graveyard or an archaeological site, their work speaks of the information we carry in our bodies and how we experience and negotiate the world through images the mind already contains. In addition to their performances, the duo often use drawings to sketch the poses that they reenact. These preparatory studies, while referencing pictorial tradition, also play a role in their investigation: a negotiation between references, and the physical and pictorial self.