siren eun young jung

  • With a practice deeply engaged with feminism and LGBT rights issues, siren eun young jung reveals the subversive power of traditional culture, one unknown in Korean modernization period, and provides unique perspectives and documentation of important communities. Through her long-term research projects bridging different generations of women, she keenly addresses questions of gender as a norm of “becoming.” Her early works have examined the struggles of a younger generation of women against androcentrism and violent patriarchy. Her subsequent projects have addressed issues surrounding environment change, human rights, activism, and homosexual rights. Her pivotal work Yeosung Gukguek Project (2008–) engages the existing queer community in South Korea by focusing on Yeosung Gukguek, an all female traditional theatre genre existing since the 1950s, after the Korean War. The ongoing project tells an empowering story of gender-becoming in the mid 20th century. Unveiling traditional yet subversive narratives that existed during the transitional period of a country moving towards a modern society and challenging the myth of Korean “andro-modernization” achieved by a rapid masculinism of national development.

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siren eun young jung

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With a practice deeply engaged with feminism and LGBT rights issues, siren eun young jung reveals the subversive power of traditional culture, one unknown in Korean modernization period, and provides unique perspectives and documentation of important communities. Through her long-term research projects bridging different generations of women, she keenly addresses questions of gender as a norm of “becoming.” Her early works have examined the struggles of a younger generation of women against androcentrism and violent patriarchy. Her subsequent projects have addressed issues surrounding environment change, human rights, activism, and homosexual rights.

Her pivotal work Yeosung Gukguek Project (2008–) engages the existing queer community in South Korea by focusing on Yeosung Gukguek, an all female traditional theatre genre existing since the 1950s, after the Korean War. The ongoing project tells an empowering story of gender-becoming in the mid 20th century. Unveiling traditional yet subversive narratives that existed during the transitional period of a country moving towards a modern society and challenging the myth of Korean “andro-modernization” achieved by a rapid masculinism of national development.