Stéphane Calais

  • From screen-printing to sculpture, as well as painting and installation, Stéphane Calais multiplies the figures of style, underpinned by the lines of drawing, all in playful and sweet world, at times disturbing. All mediums used by the artist, associated intimately with the world of drawing, exist as extensions of the sheet of paper. His series of "sculpture collage" titled "Ornement, crime et délice" illustrate his interest in the density and variety of styles and materials: nets hanging from the ceiling supporting basketballs, plants, feathers, etc. Decoration is not incidental, but is a dynamic network internal to his works. Collage is "a way to settle the real" as the artist suggests and "to cross temporalities, always on the mode of the diverse." While some violence is present between the lines, like all tales, his work contains two levels of reading. For example, Calais is fascinated by the work and the tragic fate of Bruno Schulz, a Polish-Jewish writer and artist, who "is one of the designers of fantasy, this great line that forges a truly global world" as depicted in the installation "La chambre de Schultz" (2007-2008). Stéphanie Calais was born in 1967. He lives and works in Paris.

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Stéphane Calais

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From screen-printing to sculpture, as well as painting and installation, Stéphane Calais multiplies the figures of style, underpinned by the lines of drawing, all in playful and sweet world, at times disturbing. All mediums used by the artist, associated intimately with the world of drawing, exist as extensions of the sheet of paper. His series of “sculpture collage” titled “Ornement, crime et délice” illustrate his interest in the density and variety of styles and materials: nets hanging from the ceiling supporting basketballs, plants, feathers, etc. Decoration is not incidental, but is a dynamic network internal to his works. Collage is “a way to settle the real” as the artist suggests and “to cross temporalities, always on the mode of the diverse.” While some violence is present between the lines, like all tales, his work contains two levels of reading. For example, Calais is fascinated by the work and the tragic fate of Bruno Schulz, a Polish-Jewish writer and artist, who “is one of the designers of fantasy, this great line that forges a truly global world” as depicted in the installation “La chambre de Schultz” (2007-2008).
Stéphanie Calais was born in 1967. He lives and works in Paris.