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Valentina Liernur

  • Known primarily for her paintings, but also working within performance and installation, Valentina Limur explores themes of identity, the female body, sex, fetishization, pleasure and pain. Her previous studies in architecture, music and theatre inform her unique conception of painting, which is infused with elements of theatricality and performance. In Liernur’s approach, style can be applied as a performative principle, and the body is always part of the process: whether as subject matter or as the movement suggested by gestural brushstrokes and the aggressive tearing, scratching and bleaching that she inflicts on her canvases. Liernur’s style is malleable and undecided, pivoting between abstraction and figuration and nodding to a wide range of art historical legacies and figures — from Picasso to Francis Bacon to the slashed canvases of Lucio Fontana. Her process is inspired by the mundane and driven by a sense of play and discovery with the materials she stumbles upon. In her studio she enters an experimental state where she might draw a female body, only to find the desire to add geometric shapes and stick on objects to later sand them down. Canvas, curtains, kitchen gloves, and bleached denim all form part of her DIY repertoire.

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Valentina Liernur

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Known primarily for her paintings, but also working within performance and installation, Valentina Limur explores themes of identity, the female body, sex, fetishization, pleasure and pain. Her previous studies in architecture, music and theatre inform her unique conception of painting, which is infused with elements of theatricality and performance. In Liernur’s approach, style can be applied as a performative principle, and the body is always part of the process: whether as subject matter or as the movement suggested by gestural brushstrokes and the aggressive tearing, scratching and bleaching that she inflicts on her canvases. Liernur’s style is malleable and undecided, pivoting between abstraction and figuration and nodding to a wide range of art historical legacies and figures — from Picasso to Francis Bacon to the slashed canvases of Lucio Fontana. Her process is inspired by the mundane and driven by a sense of play and discovery with the materials she stumbles upon. In her studio she enters an experimental state where she might draw a female body, only to find the desire to add geometric shapes and stick on objects to later sand them down. Canvas, curtains, kitchen gloves, and bleached denim all form part of her DIY repertoire.