Wong Wai Yin

  • Wong Wai Yin experiments with a variety of media, ranging from painting, sculpture, collage, installations and photography. Her extensive body of work calls into question the role of art in our economic structure and the arbitrary value given to works of art. She forces us to think about notions of quality, utility and value and challenges our belief in the credibility of one of the most important middle-class pastimes, in Hong Kong in particular, that of shopping. Wong takes the ephemera daily lives; the things we take for granted in our wallets or handbags, the everyday bits and pieces we pick up from the supermarket, and the things we throw away and re-presents them to us transformed into original hand-crafted works of art. She does this in ways that are wanton, witty and whimsical. Her work is playful, irresponsible and capricious, and as a result, completely engaging and irreverent of presumed boundaries between gallery-exhibited art and daily life. Her videos and installation, by comparison, are reminiscent of the conceptual art of the 1960s that questioned the process of making art, authorship and the definition of art as a unique original object in an age of mechanical reproduction.

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Wong Wai Yin

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Wong Wai Yin experiments with a variety of media, ranging from painting, sculpture, collage, installations and photography. Her extensive body of work calls into question the role of art in our economic structure and the arbitrary value given to works of art. She forces us to think about notions of quality, utility and value and challenges our belief in the credibility of one of the most important middle-class pastimes, in Hong Kong in particular, that of shopping. Wong takes the ephemera daily lives; the things we take for granted in our wallets or handbags, the everyday bits and pieces we pick up from the supermarket, and the things we throw away and re-presents them to us transformed into original hand-crafted works of art. She does this in ways that are wanton, witty and whimsical. Her work is playful, irresponsible and capricious, and as a result, completely engaging and irreverent of presumed boundaries between gallery-exhibited art and daily life. Her videos and installation, by comparison, are reminiscent of the conceptual art of the 1960s that questioned the process of making art, authorship and the definition of art as a unique original object in an age of mechanical reproduction.